Lute, Sketch 061

Sketch of the Lute

Maybe could make music

1596; Augsburg, Germany; Wood, various other materials

1596; Augsburg, Germany; Wood, various other materials

Description from the Metropolitan Museum of Art:

The back of this Renaissance lute is constructed of twenty-five ebony or rosewood ribs with ivory spacers, and its top is Alpine spruce. It was probably originally made for seven or eight courses (pairs) of strings, but in the seventeenth century the neck, bridge, and pegbox were replaced or modified to give the instrument a Baroque configuration. In the nineteenth century, the neck was reduced, fixed frets were added, and the instrument was changed to six-strings, like on a guitar.

Sixtus Rauchwolff had an excellent reputation in his day and was a maker of lutes for the prominent Fugger family and the court orchestra in Stuttgart. A label inside the instrument identifies him as the maker and 1596 as the date of the lute. The name of Matthias Hummel, who probably made the Baroque alterations to the instrument, also appears.

Sketch 061: Lute, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Joseph W. Drexel, 1889

An Afternoon in Georgetown

I recently drove up to Georgetown, Texas for the afternoon and managed to take a few photos. It was a nice day to be a tourist.

Melophone, Sketch 060

Sketch of the Melophone

Somewhat skewed

circa 1850–1855; Paris, France

circa 1850–1855; Paris, France

Description from the Metropolitan Museum of Art:

The melophone, which was invented in Paris in 1837, was developed for classical music. The inventor, the music-box maker Pierre Charles Leclerc, persuaded the composer Fromentin Halévy to include a melophone solo in his opera Guido et Ginevra in 1838-and this opened the doors to the salons of many Paris opera patrons. But the success of the melophone was modest; its use declined, and it fell out of style in the 1850s and 60s. Beside its occasional use in the salons in France, it was also known in Italy and southern Germany.

The melophone is a free-reed instrument related to accordions, concertinas, reed organs, and harmonicas. The setup, with a double bellows and a push-and-draw lever, allows the player to perform tremolo and staccato, soft and loud. The thumb lever is an octave coupler. The fingering mechanism imitates the technique of violin and guitar, making it easy for string players to play the melophone. The eight vertical rows of the fingering mechanism correspond to strings tuned in fifth, and the thirteen individual buttons correspond to the half steps.

Sketch 060: Melophone, Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Crosby Brown Collection of Musical Instruments, 1889

Waterfall and Ferns

a small waterfall in St. Edward's Park

Waterfall

I met up with my hiking group at St. Edward’s Park. Bull Creek runs through the area and has this nice waterfall.

The bottom of the waterfall, where the falling water enters the pond

Ferns growing at the water’s edge


Monday Up Close

Ceramic Horn, Sketch 059

Sketch of the ceramic horn

Wobbly circles

Glazed Pottery; late 18th or early 19th century; France

Glazed Pottery; late 18th or early 19th century; France

This week’s theme: Musical Instruments

Sketch 059: Ceramic Horn, Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Crosby Brown Collection of Musical Instruments, 1889

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